Knowledge sharing

Who is the Data Processor (DP) and what are its responsibilities under the General Data Protection Regulation

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The data processor (DP) is an entity that processes personal data for the account, on instruction and under the authority of the Data Controller (DC)-other than the employee of the DC. This enity can be a natural or legal person, public authority, agency or another body. Art. 4 (8) GDPR process Personal Data (PD) on behalf of the Data Controller (DC).

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Rights of Data Subjects under the GDPR

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The Data Controller (“DC”) is the person who, alone or jointly, determines the purpose and means of the processing of personal data; in other words, is the person who decides why other’s personal data is processed and how it would be processed. Art. 4 (7) GDPR determines the purpose and means of the processing of Personal Data (PD).

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Private Automatic Branch Exchange Fraud

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A substantial increase in your telephone bill is an indication your company could be the victim of Private Automatic Branch Exchange (PABX) fraud. Detailed billing will assist in identifying any potential unauthorised calls, usually International calls but they can also be National telephone calls. Another indicator is where customers trying to dial, in or employees trying to dial out, find that the lines are always busy.

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Phone Fraud

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Telephone fraud involves criminals contacting you by phone (vishing) or by text (Smishing) pretending to be your bank, credit card issuer, utility company or often a computer company. During the conversation they will try and trick you into giving personal, banking or security information. Fraud perpetrators may also convince you to make a money transfer to them or inform you that you have won a prize and need to send money to release it. Their intention is to use this information to commit fraud against you or other parties in your name.

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Email Fraud

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Email fraud (“Phishing”) involves fraud perpetrators making contact by email and can take a number of forms. The email may appear to be from a reputable company however when one clicks on the email or attachment or link within the email, malicious software (malware) is downloaded onto the PC or other device allowing the fraud perpetrator to track online activity and identify personal or financial information for fraudulent purposes. Both individuals and companies can be victims of this type of crime.

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Business Email Compromise (BEC) Fraud

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Business Email Compromise (BEC) Fraud (or CEO Fraud) is similar to Invoice Redirection Fraud however in this case junior employees in the finance department of a company receive an email from a fraud perpetrator purporting to be the Chief Executive Officer stating that an important deal or some other urgent matter is pending and that a substantial payment needs to be processed immediately.

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